"Masterpieces of the State Russian Museum" Exhibition

Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum

poster for "Masterpieces of the State Russian Museum" Exhibition

This event has ended.

Established in 1898 under Nicholai II, the State Russian Museum was the first national museum in Russia. The museum holds the largest collection in Russia, approximately 400,000 pieces ranging from the 10th century to the contemporary.

This exhibition consists of about 80 works from their collection including painting, sculpture, and craft made between the 18th century and the 20th century. This would be the first exhibition in Japan featuring such a large part of Russian art history. Incorporating the Rococo style and Romanticism, Russian art explored its own unique style. During this time, magnificent natural landscapes of Russia was a popular theme. On the other hand, not only were there idealistic paintings of myths and heroes, but realistic paintings of ordinary people also started to appear.

In the late 19th century, Russia faced a revolutionary period. Kramskoi, Repin, and Surikov depicted lives of civilians and farmers, the history of Russia, the human spirit and splendid landscapes. They organized traveling shows across Russia to provide opportunities for people to see art. This is when art came to belong to the people, no longer just the aristocrats.

This exhibition reveals the "golden age" of Russia between the 18th to the 20th century with a thorough display of pieces.

Media

Schedule

From 2007-04-28 To 2007-07-08
Closed on Mondays except April 30th

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Reviews

Yuya Suzuki tablog review

国立ロシア美術館展-ロシア絵画の神髄

東京都美術館で開催されている「国立ロシア美術館展」は、ロシアの四大美術館(エルミタージュ、プーシキン、トレチャコフ、国立ロシア)の一角、特に近代ロシア美術のコレクションに秀でた美術館の巡回展である。昨年は同美術館でエルミタージュ美術館と一昨年にはプーシキン美術館の巡回展が開催されたが、これは飽くまでも近代から現代に掛けての西欧美術コレクションの開陳であった。

donald_japantimes: (2007-06-28 at 12:06)

Russia as it wanted to be
Exhibition of Russian art shows a nation that was taking its cues from the West
By Marius Gombrich
Special to The Japan Times

The tension between the Potemkin village — the false front — of a happily modernizing Russia, and the country that still clung under the surface to its native traditions and inclinations, provides the real fascination of this exhibition. After ticking the boxes for all the influences of Western art, what stands out are the uniquely Russian elements ...

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/fa20070628a1.html

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