Nullus

The Club

poster for Nullus

Ends in 10 days

Nullus - The translation of this Latin word is “zero” or “none”, but it could also mean “everything” by simply adding non to the end it “nullus non”. The programming word “null”, as well as the art movement, “The Dutch Nul Group” both originate from “nullus”.

This exhibition examines the signification of white (uncolor) by taking a close look into the works by three artists, Taizo Kuroda, Pierro Manzoni, and Enrico Castellani, and how they used it to explore what goes beyond material word. Japan’s leading ceramist, Taizo Kuroda transcended the ordinary objects into the conceptual state. On the other hand, Europe’s leading conceptual artist, Pierro Manzoni, created a series of paintings named “Achrome” by using Chinese clay, a material traditionally used in ceramics. Enrico Castellani was fascinated by Manzoni’s “Achrome” series and he has taken the idea further and developed his own series so called “light paintings”.

Kuroda turned everyday objects such as cylinders, flower vases and platters into the purest of white forms to the point where they are almost no longer usable. Manzoni attempted to release paintings from any narrative content by removing colors. And Castellani eliminated any sign of the artist’s hand, and made patters of shadows on white surface into art.

Interestingly, what these there artists have in common despite the completely different art approach is the use of “uncolor” to go beyond the physicality. It resulted creating works that are so close to nothingness, which a state of world that is also everything.

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Schedule

from July 27, 2020 to August 14, 2020
By appointment only. (Please visit official website for the details.), Exhibition Hours 12:00-19:00, Closed on Saturdays, Sundays and Public Holidays.

Fee

Free

Venue Hours

From 11:00 To 19:00

Access

Address: 6-10-1 Ginza, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0061
Phone: 03-3575-5605

2 minute walk from exit A3 at Ginza Station on the Ginza, Marunouchi and Hibiya lines. 3 minute walk from exit A1 at Higashi-ginza Station on the Toei Asakusa or the Hibiya line.

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