Yasuo Kazuki: A Retrospective

The Miyagi Museum of Art

poster for Yasuo Kazuki: A Retrospective
[Image: Yasuo Kazuki "Hammock" (1941) The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo]

This event has ended.

Yasuo Kazuki (1911-1974), born in Misumi Village (now Nagato City), Yamaguchi Prefecture, studied at the Tokyo Art School and entered the art world through the Kokugakukai. Just as his paintings were beginning to attract attention for their clear colors and unique lyricism, he was drafted into the army and served in Manchuria. After his defeat in the war, he was interned in Siberia and survived the harsh environment in which he lost many comrades in arms, and was demobilized in 1947.

After his demobilization, he never left his homeland, but worked on the “Siberia Series” based on his experiences of war and internment, and completed 57 paintings by the time of his death. The pain of extreme conditions, the repose of souls and longing for home, and the harsh yet vivid beauty of nature etched on his massive black and yellowish-brown paintings continue to deeply impact and move us.

This exhibition will be the first time that the entire “Siberia Series” will be exhibited in Tohoku. Although it is common to present the works in the order of Kazuki’s experiences, the order of creation is actually quite different. In this exhibition, we will dismantle the narrative and reexamine the position of the series by showing the works in the order in which they were created along with other works. The exhibition will also introduce the diverse appeal of Kazuki’s work, including his early works rich in poetic sentiment and his affectionate depictions of familiar motifs, which go beyond the scope of “Siberian painter,” and explore the essence of his form and message.

First period: July 3 (Saturday) - August 1 (Sunday)
Second period: August 3 (Tuesday) - September 5 (Sunday)

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Schedule

from July 03, 2021 to September 05, 2021

Artist(s)

Yasuo Kazuki

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