The National Treasure Irises Screens—The Allure of Color

The Nezu Museum

poster for The National Treasure Irises Screens—The Allure of Color

Ends in 7 days

*The Nezu Museum is temporarily closed from April 25 (Sun) to May 11 (Tue).

In his Irises folding screens, Ogata Kōrin (1657-1716) depicted clusters of irises on a large gold-foiled picture plane using only azurite blue and malachite green pigments. These three colors, blue, green, and gold (or yellow), are often combined; together they have a distinctive tradition in Japan and in the East in general. The vigorous color sense of this work also reflects an aesthetic characteristic of the Edo period. This exhibition also includes a sutra copied in gold pigment on indigo-dyed dark blue paper, Buddhist paintings from the middle ages to which gold has been added to a design with blue and green as the dominant colors, and a kinpeki sansui (Chinese: jinbi shanshui) or landscape in gold and blue-green, a genre that dates back to the Tang period (618-907). They are joined by ceramics from the Momoyama through the Edo periods in which these three colors play key roles, including innovative ko-kutani and ki-seto wares. With the addition of several other golden folding screens using the same colors, this exhibition attempts to shed new light on the Irises screens.

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Schedule

from April 17, 2021 to May 16, 2021
By appointment only.

Artist(s)

Korin Ogata et al.

Website

http://www.nezu-muse.or.jp/en/ (venue's website)

Fee

Online tickets: Adults ¥1500, University and High School Students ¥1200 Same-day tickets: Adults ¥1600, University and High School Students ¥1300, Junior High School Students and Under free.

Venue Hours

From 10:00 To 17:00
Closed on Mondays
Note:Open on public holiday Monday but closed on the following day. Closed during the New Year holidays and in between exhibitions.

Access

Address: 6-5-1 Minami-Aoyama, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-0062
Phone: 03-3400-2536 Fax: 03-3400-2436

8 minute walk from exit A5 at Omotesando Station on the Ginza, Hanzomon and Chiyoda lines.

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