Photographic Distance - Distance between World and Me Measured by Blurred Pictures and Continuous Gradation

Tochigi Prefectural Museum of Fine Arts

poster for Photographic Distance - Distance between World and Me Measured by Blurred Pictures and Continuous Gradation
[Image: Nobuo Yamanaka B&W Contact Pin-hole (9) (1973)]

This event has ended.

*Tochigi Prefectural Museum of Fine Arts is temporarily closed from August 23 (Mon) to September 12 (Sun).
*The exhibition period has been shortened. (Originally 2021/7/17–9/5).

In the 1970s, photoengraving prints, such as silkscreen prints, were given an aesthetic value of being “cooler” than oil paintings. Halftoning, with its pseudo-gradation of dots, was also a way to enlarge low-quality photographs.

In the 1980s, however, the emergence of high-definition photographic prints of huge size but without grain, produced by photographic artists backed by advanced technology that surpassed that of photographic professionals, led to the elimination of halftone images using reticulated dots.

However, from the end of the 20th century to the present day, as the world began to be flooded with high-resolution images, ironically, the appeal of blurry and indistinct images began to attract attention as a new aesthetic value.

In this exhibition, the new aesthetic value of blurred images in the digital age is confirmed through a comparison of three different types of material, including prints made by photoengraving, which seemed to have been expunged from contemporary art, high-resolution photographic prints, and paintings and prints that look like photographs. Comparing three different types of material in about 90 prints, including paintings and prints like photographs, will confirm the new aesthetic value of blurred images in the digital age and reconsider the significance of the continuous tone inherent in photography.

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Schedule

from July 17, 2021 to August 22, 2021
Open on August 9. Closed on August 10.

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