"Iwata Nakayama: Modernist Light and Shadow" Exhibition

Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography

poster for "Iwata Nakayama: Modernist Light and Shadow" Exhibition

This event has ended.

Iwata Nakayama is an important modern Japanese photographer who broke new ground for expression in the medium.

After graduating from the photography department at Tokyo University of the Arts in 1918, Nakayama moved to the U.S. as an overseas trainee of the Department of Commerce. He established a photography studio in New York in 1921, and then moved to Paris to work for magazines such as Femina. Upon his return to Japan, Nakayama brought back influences derived from European Modernism which were reflected in his work, basing himself in Ashiya, founding the Ashiya Camera Club, and becoming a sort of standard-bearer for the promotion of new, pioneering photography.

This exhibition showcases silver salt photographic prints obtained through the research of the Ashiya Museum of Art on dry glass plate photography, along with original prints by Nakayama himself. Focusing on major works from his early New York phase right up until his late period, this showcase of Nakayama's work features around 50 prints and dry glass plates that shed light on his production process. In addition, a wide variety of archival materials will be on display alongside the photos, such as the photography publication "Koga." These new prints are not only a recreation of Nakayama's splendid photographic sensibilities and dynamics, but also a valuable historical legacy of silver print photography to be handed down to posterity at a time of veritable crisis for the medium.

Media

Schedule

From 2008-12-13 To 2009-02-08
Closed December 29th (Mon) through January 1st (Thu)

Artist(s)

Iwata Nakayama

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Reviews

sightsong: (2009-01-02)

歴史的な作品よりもむしろ、スナップ写真にライヴ性があって素晴らしい。『上海から来た女』の現代版プリントは、各種バライタ紙の比較が行ってあって必見。
http://pub.ne.jp/Sightsong/?entry_id=1876230

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