TOP Collection: Scrolling Through Heisei Part 1 “In the Here and Now”

Tokyo Photographic Art Musem

poster for TOP Collection: Scrolling Through Heisei Part 1 “In the Here and Now”

This event has ended.

The phrase “in the here and now” has come to be questioned again and again since the start of the Heisei era, in 1989. After more than a quarter-century, this era has faced up to various difficult situations: social problems, economic crises, natural disasters. Various events drastically changing our daily lives have taken place: the 1995 Kobe earthquake and Tokyo subway sarin attack, the 2001 terror incidents in America, the 2008 worldwide financial crisis, and the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, for which recovery efforts are still underway.

It is precisely because the “everyday” of Heisei has been given over to such calmness — afforded by the stable development of society — that these events have resulted in great shock. When facing up to large questions that cast a shadow over our everyday lives, and that cannot be easily dealt with by individuals, the meaning of “in the here and now” must be considered before anything else. Sometimes a simple or fundamental question like this conceals the power to break open a difficult situation.

Photography is a record of being “in the here and now,” showing the various ways through which photographers relate to the world. While thinking through their concerns at a riverbank, suburban houses, the parking lot of a shopping mall in a foreign country, or a room in their own house, photographers record being “in the here and now.” Sometimes, this power of imagination cannot be contained within a mere record; it brings forth a new sight before our eyes. Through the ordinary, the extraordinary, and the narrow space between the two, in what ways have photographers faced up to the world and thought about the meaning of “in the here and now?” This exhibition will look for the direction towards which such possibilities left behind on photographic paper orient themselves.

[Related Events]
“Experiment with careful observation and producing your own images”
Event Date: Jun. 25 (Sun) 10:30-12:30, Jul. 2 (Sun) 10:30-12:30
A chance to look closely around the exhibition and discuss the subjects of the work with those involved, followed by a simple dark room demonstration. (Not a guided exhibition tour).
Capacity: 10 pairs (for elementary school students and guardians)
Admission: ¥800 (plus exhibition admission fee)
*Event in Japanese.
*See official website for further event details.

Media

Schedule

from 5月 13, 2017 to 7月 09, 2017

Facebook

Reviews

All content on this site is © their respective owner(s).
Tokyo Art Beat (2004 - 2020) - About - Contact - Privacy - Terms of Use